EverPower advances 126 MW Cassadaga wind power project

Cassadaga Wind, a unit of EverPower Wind Holdings, made a Sept. 4 filing with the New York State Public Service Commission ahead of its planned application for approval to construct a 126 MW wind project under Article 10 of the Public Service Law.

Pursuant to the rules of the New York State Board on Electric Generation Siting and the Environment, applicants proposing to submit an application to construct a major electric generating facility under Article 10 must submit a preliminary scoping statement, which is what was filed on Sept. 4. This must be filed no less than 90 days before the date on which an application is filed.

The Cassadaga Wind Project is a 126 MW facility to be located within the Towns of Charlotte, Cherry Creek, Arkwright and Stockton in Chautauqua County, New York. The project will be located on leased private land that is rural in nature. The project includes the installation and operation of up to 62 wind turbines, together with about 34 miles of associated collection lines, about 19 miles of access roads, up to two permanent meteorological towers, one operation and maintenance (O&M) building, and up to four temporary construction staging/laydown areas.

To deliver electricity to the New York State power grid, the applicant proposes to construct a collection substation, a 115-kV generator lead line and a point of interconnection substation, which will interconnect with National Grid’s Dunkirk-Moon 115-kV transmission line. It is anticipated that the newly constructed 115-kV generator lead line will be approximately 5.5 miles in length.

The Cassadaga Wind Project will have a nameplate capacity of up to 126 MW, and is expected to operate at an annual net capacity factor of about 36 percent. This means that over the course of a full calendar year the project would produce up to 397,353 MWh of energy (i.e., 126 MW x 24 hrs/day x 365 days x 36 percent).

Prior to this PSS, the applicant prepared a public involvement program, the initial draft of which was submitted to the Siting Board in November 2014. Comments on the program were received from the New York State Department of Public Service in December 2014, and the PIP was updated, finalized and filed by the applicant on Jan. 4, 2015.

Previous articleNew York PSC wants look at grid impacts of two coal plant shutdowns
Next articlePSEG Long Island launches mobile features for customers
Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy's Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication's editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor's degree from Central Michigan University.

No posts to display