CMS Energy has slashed coal-fired generation since 2005

CMS Energy and its utility unit Consumers Energy have come a long way in reducing their reliance on coal-fired power since 2005.

That’s according to various materials released March 11 by CMS in connection with a series of investor meetings scheduled March 14 through March 18.

The company has gone from 41 percent reliance on coal power in 2005 to 24 percent coal in 2016. The natural gas share of the CMS capacity has grown from 31 percent in 2005 to 34 percent in 2016.

The company is retiring 950 MW of coal power and is well-positioned with Michigan’s target for EPA Clean Power Plan compliance, according to the slides.

The company is employing more renewables, expanded hydroelectric pumped storage and clean energy options, according to the CMS slides.

The CMS Energy presentation notes that the company has a power purchase agreement with an option to purchase the 100-MW Apple Blossom. The facility is expected to start commercial operation in 2018 and CMS has a deal to acquire capacity, energy, and renewable credits.

CMS said that it is also developing utility-scale solar Grand Valley State University (3 MW) and Western Michigan University (1 MW).

CMS announced in January that President and CEO John Russell will turn over the helm of CMS in July to Patricia (Patti) Kessler Poppe. Poppe is currently senior vice president of distribution operations, engineering and transmission for Consumers Energy.

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Wayne Barber, Chief Analyst for the GenerationHub, has been covering power generation, energy and natural resources issues at national publications for more than 22 years. Prior to joining PennWell he was editor of Generation Markets Week at SNL Financial for nine years. He has also worked as a business journalist at both McGraw-Hill and Financial Times Energy. Wayne also worked as a newspaper reporter for several years. During his career has visited nuclear reactors and coal mines as well as coal and natural gas power plants.

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