Spot power prices increase across all 10 EIA regions

Spot power prices in all 10 regions monitored by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an increase across the board in figures posted on the EIA website June 30.

The percentage of increase ranged from 5 percent in the Southwest to about 123 percent in the Northwest, according to GenerationHub.

 

Three of the 10 regions reported spot power prices above $60/MWh. Northern California had the highest spot price in the nation at $62.77/MWh. The Midwest showed a spot power price of $62.30/MWh. Louisiana posted a price of $60.50/MWh.

Meanwhile the trend was going in the opposite direction for spot natural gas prices. All 10 regions tracked by EIA showed a decrease in spot gas prices. This ranged from roughly a 3 percent decrease in Houston to a decrease of almost 21 percent in New England.

On the baseload nuclear power availability front, only two of the nation’s 100 commercial power reactors were listed at zero generation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on June 30.

The Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG) Salem 2 facility in New Jersey continues to be offline for a refueling outage. Also the PPL Susquehanna 2 plant in Pennsylvania continues to be offline for a turbine blade inspection.

Finally, it appears the Duke Energy Catawba 1 unit in South Carolina has returned to virtually full-power. After going offline for a regular refueling and maintenance outage in early May, the nuclear plant was listed at 97 percent power on June 30.

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Wayne Barber, Chief Analyst for the GenerationHub, has been covering power generation, energy and natural resources issues at national publications for more than 22 years. Prior to joining PennWell he was editor of Generation Markets Week at SNL Financial for nine years. He has also worked as a business journalist at both McGraw-Hill and Financial Times Energy. Wayne also worked as a newspaper reporter for several years. During his career has visited nuclear reactors and coal mines as well as coal and natural gas power plants.

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