0212 Executive Digest.IR 2

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

Alabama Power and Duke Energy Corp. are collaborating with several utilities in a distribution feeder efficiency demonstration. The utilities, as part of an EPRI Green Circuits project, are taking specific energy-conservation measures to meet the growing demand for electricity.

These measures include system improve­ments to reduce distribution losses and operating part of the feeders’ voltages in the lower half of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) C84.1-2006 allowable voltage range to achieve end use consumption savings.

The utilities were seeking to gain a better understanding of how voltage optimization could be used to reduce energy requirements in the distribution system. The field trial was part of the EPRI Distribution Green Circuits project and resulted in preliminary results that Alabama Power and Duke Energy could achieve a potential energy reduction of 1.2 to 2.4 percent on its feeders.
 
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0212 Executive Digest.IR 2

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

Alabama Power and Duke Energy Corp. are collaborating with several utilities in a distribution feeder efficiency demonstration. The utilities, as part of an EPRI Green Circuits project, are taking specific energy-conservation measures to meet the growing demand for electricity.

These measures include system improve­ments to reduce distribution losses and operating part of the feeders’ voltages in the lower half of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) C84.1-2006 allowable voltage range to achieve end use consumption savings.

The utilities were seeking to gain a better understanding of how voltage optimization could be used to reduce energy requirements in the distribution system. The field trial was part of the EPRI Distribution Green Circuits project and resulted in preliminary results that Alabama Power and Duke Energy could achieve a potential energy reduction of 1.2 to 2.4 percent on its feeders.