0911.Executive Digest.Industry Reports.4.LBNL

This report presents projections of ratepayer-funded energy efficiency program spending and savings in the U.S. through 2020 based on a state-by-state review of energy efficiency policies and regulatory requirements in place or under consideration.

The projections suggest that the next decade is likely to see a dramatic, sustained increase in funding levels and energy savings. Total funding for electric and gas energy efficiency programs is projected to rise from roughly $3.1 billion in 2008 to between $7.5 billion and $12.4 billion in 2020 (in nominal dollars), and annual savings from electric energy efficiency programs are projected to increase from an estimated 0.3 percent of U.S. retail sales in 2008 to between 0.6 and 0.9 percent in 2020. The analysis further points toward a fundamental re-drawing of the energy efficiency map, with a significant number of states that historically have been relatively minor players on the energy efficiency stage coming to the fore.

The report also compares the projected energy savings from ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs to the savings that could be required under a national energy efficiency portfolio standard and also compares the associated carbon emission reductions to what might be required under national carbon legislation. Finally, the report lists some key challenges states likely will face as they seek to dramatically ramp up energy efficiency program activity.
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0911.Executive Digest.Industry Reports.4.LBNL

This report presents projections of ratepayer-funded energy efficiency program spending and savings in the U.S. through 2020 based on a state-by-state review of energy efficiency policies and regulatory requirements in place or under consideration.

The projections suggest that the next decade is likely to see a dramatic, sustained increase in funding levels and energy savings. Total funding for electric and gas energy efficiency programs is projected to rise from roughly $3.1 billion in 2008 to between $7.5 billion and $12.4 billion in 2020 (in nominal dollars), and annual savings from electric energy efficiency programs are projected to increase from an estimated 0.3 percent of U.S. retail sales in 2008 to between 0.6 and 0.9 percent in 2020. The analysis further points toward a fundamental re-drawing of the energy efficiency map, with a significant number of states that historically have been relatively minor players on the energy efficiency stage coming to the fore.

The report also compares the projected energy savings from ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs to the savings that could be required under a national energy efficiency portfolio standard and also compares the associated carbon emission reductions to what might be required under national carbon legislation. Finally, the report lists some key challenges states likely will face as they seek to dramatically ramp up energy efficiency program activity.