1211 Executive Digest.IR 1

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

The Common Information Model (CIM) Primer explains the basics of the CIM (IEC 61970, IEC 61968, and IEC 62325). Starting with a historical perspective, it describes how the CIM originated and grew through the years.

The functions of various working groups of Technical Committee 57 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) are described. The process of how an IEC standard is created is also outlined.

The basics of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) are detailed to introduce the reader to the language of the CIM. Then, building on commonly understood objects (basic shapes), the concepts that underline the CIM are carefully built step by step. The reader is then transported into the world of power systems where the concepts that were developed previously are applied to the complexities of the electric grid.
 
The CIM is a set of open standards for representing power system components originally developed by EPRI in North America and now a series of standards under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The standard was started as part of the Control Centre Application Programming Interface (CCAPI) project at EPRI with the aim of defining a common definition for the components in power systems for use the Energy Management System (EMS) Application Programming Interface (API), now maintained by IEC Technical Committee 57 Working Group 13 as IEC 61970-301.
 
 
About EPRI
The Electric Power Research Institute Inc. conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. An independent, nonprofit organization, EPRI brings together its scientists and engineers as well as experts from academia and industry to help address challenges in electricity, including reliability, efficiency, health, safety and the environment. EPRI’s members represent more than 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States, and international participation extends to 40 countries. EPRI’s principal offices and laboratories are in Palo Alto, Calif.; Charlotte, N.C.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Lenox, Mass.
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1211 Executive Digest.IR 1

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

The Common Information Model (CIM) Primer explains the basics of the CIM (IEC 61970, IEC 61968, and IEC 62325). Starting with a historical perspective, it describes how the CIM originated and grew through the years.

The functions of various working groups of Technical Committee 57 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) are described. The process of how an IEC standard is created is also outlined.

The basics of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) are detailed to introduce the reader to the language of the CIM. Then, building on commonly understood objects (basic shapes), the concepts that underline the CIM are carefully built step by step. The reader is then transported into the world of power systems where the concepts that were developed previously are applied to the complexities of the electric grid.
 
The CIM is a set of open standards for representing power system components originally developed by EPRI in North America and now a series of standards under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The standard was started as part of the Control Centre Application Programming Interface (CCAPI) project at EPRI with the aim of defining a common definition for the components in power systems for use the Energy Management System (EMS) Application Programming Interface (API), now maintained by IEC Technical Committee 57 Working Group 13 as IEC 61970-301.
 
 
About EPRI
The Electric Power Research Institute Inc. conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. An independent, nonprofit organization, EPRI brings together its scientists and engineers as well as experts from academia and industry to help address challenges in electricity, including reliability, efficiency, health, safety and the environment. EPRI’s members represent more than 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States, and international participation extends to 40 countries. EPRI’s principal offices and laboratories are in Palo Alto, Calif.; Charlotte, N.C.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Lenox, Mass.