ARRA spending on conventional coal power outpaces carbon capture

Washington, D.C., September 1, 2010 — Recent U.S. government investment in traditional coal-fired power plants is exceeding the amount spent on carbon capture and other “clean coal” techniques, according to media reports.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act included $3.4 billion meant to further the cause of clean coal as a generation technology, as well as to convert older coal-fired plants to capture and store carbon.

However, since 2008, about $35 billion has been spent on building traditional coal-fired generation units that lack carbon capture and storage capacity.

In August 2010, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced the selection of 15 projects related to storing carbon dioxide in geologic formations, a key component of the carbon capture and sequestration technology. These projects will be funded with $21.3 million over three years, according to the DOE.

The DOE is also working with Ameren, Babcock and Wilcox, American Air Liquide and the FutureGen Alliance (which is made up of utility partners and technology providers) to determine the next steps in the development of the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage project in Illinois.

After September 2010, preparations will begin for the repowering of Unit 4 of the Ameren facility in Meredosia, Illinois. Construction is slated to begin in 2012.

At the same time, a site selection process will be conducted to locate a site for the carbon sequestration research, repowering workforce training facility, visitor center, and long-term carbon dioxide repository.

 

Previous articleIntegrated Electrical Services to build wind farm substation and transmission line
Next articleGE, Westinghouse plan Indian nuclear plants

ARRA spending on conventional coal power outpaces carbon capture

Washington, D.C., September 1, 2010 — Recent U.S. government investment in traditional coal-fired power plants is exceeding the amount spent on carbon capture and other “clean coal” techniques, according to media reports.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act included $3.4 billion meant to further the cause of clean coal as a generation technology, as well as to convert older coal-fired plants to capture and store carbon.

However, since 2008, about $35 billion has been spent on building traditional coal-fired generation units that lack carbon capture and storage capacity.

In August 2010, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced the selection of 15 projects related to storing carbon dioxide in geologic formations, a key component of the carbon capture and sequestration technology. These projects will be funded with $21.3 million over three years, according to the DOE.

The DOE is also working with Ameren, Babcock and Wilcox, American Air Liquide and the FutureGen Alliance (which is made up of utility partners and technology providers) to determine the next steps in the development of the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage project in Illinois.

After September 2010, preparations will begin for the repowering of Unit 4 of the Ameren facility in Meredosia, Illinois. Construction is slated to begin in 2012.

At the same time, a site selection process will be conducted to locate a site for the carbon sequestration research, repowering workforce training facility, visitor center, and long-term carbon dioxide repository.