India’s northern grid back up, then back down?

New Delhi, August 2, 2012 — Indian states could have faced another massive power failure August 1 as the Northern grid was on the verge of tripping, according to the Uttar Pradesh Power Corp.

According to reports, the 400 kV double-circuit transmission line between Gwalior and Agra had overloading and could have resulted in a grid collapse on the evening of August 1.

Linemen, however, intervened at the correct time to prevent it by reducing the load on the line to 600 MW. The linemen reportedly reduced the load by cutting the electricity in several parts that are supplied by the line after they saw the load on the line had reached 800 MW.

The three major electricity grids that failed July 31 plunging half the nation into complete darkness, were restored on the morning of August 2.

“System restored to normal state,” according to a release from the Power Grid Corp. of India.

“Delhi — 3,802 MW (100 percent), Northern region (Delhi Inclusive) — 31,883 MW (100 percent), Eastern region — 13,499 MW (100 percent), North Eastern region — 1,560 MW (100 percent), Western Region — 30,687 MW (100 percent), Southern Region — 28,323 MW (100 percent), All India – 105,952 MW,” according to the statement

Northern state of Uttar Pradesh, which has been accused of overdrawing power causing the crisis, denied it was not responsible for the grid failure.

Besides, Uttar Pradesh, the three other northern states of Rajasthan, Haryana, Punjab also allegedly drew power much above their quota.

India, Asia’s third largest economy, grappled with the suffering of an unprecedented power grid failure for the second successive day July 31 plunging half the nation in complete darkness, halting hundreds of trains, stranding miners, blacking out traffic signals and affecting supply to hospitals.

About half of the 1.2 billion people in India were affected July 31 as the three grids of western, eastern and northern regions tripped after alleged overdrawing of power from grids by some states.

The affected states on Tuesday were 19, including Punjab, Haryana, Delhi, Uttarakhand, Himachal Pradesh, Odisha, Jharkhand, Bihar besides West Bengal and Sikkim. India has 28 states.

Previous articleABB wins $55 million wind power order in Brazil
Next articleARPA-E announces $43 million for electric vehicles, energy storage

India’s northern grid back up, then back down?

New Delhi, August 2, 2012 — Indian states could have faced another massive power failure August 1 as the Northern grid was on the verge of tripping, according to the Uttar Pradesh Power Corp.

According to reports, the 400 kV double-circuit transmission line between Gwalior and Agra had overloading and could have resulted in a grid collapse on the evening of August 1.

Linemen, however, intervened at the correct time to prevent it by reducing the load on the line to 600 MW. The linemen reportedly reduced the load by cutting the electricity in several parts that are supplied by the line after they saw the load on the line had reached 800 MW.

The three major electricity grids that failed July 31 plunging half the nation into complete darkness, were restored on the morning of August 2.

“System restored to normal state,” according to a release from the Power Grid Corp. of India.

“Delhi — 3,802 MW (100 percent), Northern region (Delhi Inclusive) — 31,883 MW (100 percent), Eastern region — 13,499 MW (100 percent), North Eastern region — 1,560 MW (100 percent), Western Region — 30,687 MW (100 percent), Southern Region — 28,323 MW (100 percent), All India – 105,952 MW,” according to the statement

Northern state of Uttar Pradesh, which has been accused of overdrawing power causing the crisis, denied it was not responsible for the grid failure.

Besides, Uttar Pradesh, the three other northern states of Rajasthan, Haryana, Punjab also allegedly drew power much above their quota.

India, Asia’s third largest economy, grappled with the suffering of an unprecedented power grid failure for the second successive day July 31 plunging half the nation in complete darkness, halting hundreds of trains, stranding miners, blacking out traffic signals and affecting supply to hospitals.

About half of the 1.2 billion people in India were affected July 31 as the three grids of western, eastern and northern regions tripped after alleged overdrawing of power from grids by some states.

The affected states on Tuesday were 19, including Punjab, Haryana, Delhi, Uttarakhand, Himachal Pradesh, Odisha, Jharkhand, Bihar besides West Bengal and Sikkim. India has 28 states.