Optimizing utility power operations: How satellite tracking systems can detect inefficiencies

By Polina Braunstein, CEO, Quake Global

Many companies spend countless hours trying to ensure that they conduct their operations according to maximum profit potential. Maximizing productivity while minimizing costs are obvious key factors to the final equation.

However, an all too common obstacle to this goal is the inherent difficulty in monitoring certain aspects of those business operations, particularly in remote or mobile locations. The utility industry is no exception.

Here’s a good scenario. A power outage brings with it lost revenue and bad publicity, but perhaps the most costly aspect of such an event is the amount of overtime required making repairs to remote transmission lines.

This can be compounded exponentially if the equipment that is used to fix them is not operating effectively. Satellite technology can monitor in-use and idle times of such gear while it’s in the field that will identify issues related to how better to deploy the necessary people and gear to reduce down-time.

This case study is a clear illustration for why utility operators should consider leveraging the benefits of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) satellite technology.

With single or dual mode satellite/terrestrial modems as a standard feature for all their equipment, power generation companies can track, monitor and even control their offerings and assets anywhere in the world, all without the need for in-field inspectors or the sole word of the operators.

Newly released next-generation hardware now even permits customers to install network agnostic modems which seamlessly select the most economically appropriate network based on user defined criteria while maintaining industrial strength and fitting in the palm of your hand.

This exciting new technology also provides system integrators with a unified communications protocol to vastly simplify development by providing them with a single communication protocol for all networks.

How it works

Recent enhancements in modem functionality, form factor and cost reduction as well as in Low Earth Orbit and Geosynchronous Earth Orbit networks have made installing these devices on remote equipment not only viable, but highly cost effective.

Such technology allows the development of satellite communicators that transmit short bursts of data that use far less power and take up far less space than did their predecessors. 

These significant changes in global communication access have led many important industries to quickly introduce this technology into their business models not only to maintain their competitive advantages and avoid being technologically outmaneuvered by their competitors, but also to focus on their own business processes and efficiencies.

In addition to ensuring maximum productivity of specific repair equipment, companies can keep tabs on other important aspects of their operations. For instance, transmission lines can be tracked in real time and identify delays and breaks as they happen. This access to information as it occurs is critical for supervisors who must make adjustments with minimal operational impact.

Must haves

In order to ensure such systems will be of optimal value, satellite modem providers at a minimum must be able to offer companies the following features, functions and services:

* Cost-effectively operate in multiple environments. The modem is only as good as its transmit data, and that means seamlessly working with all the main network protocols, such as major satellite operators, GSM, and GPS.

* Support for subscriber-based services. The modem provider must also offer turnkey services — either directly or in partnership with systems integrators — that provide companies the ability to offer tracking and monitoring services to their customers without building out the infrastructure themselves.

* Proven success. The modem provider must be able to offer recent examples of how their systems have been used to reduce costs and increase revenues for a myriad of companies and operations, including transportation, heavy equipment, ships, fishing boats, pipelines and utility meters.

Utility companies are continually under pressure to find efficiencies wherever possible to keep profit margins stable in an era where customers continually put pressure on pricing.

Satellite modem technology — when effectively employed such as with QUAKE’s new line of Q4000 series modems — will be one of the key standard components in helping an organization achieve the highest operational efficiency, and in return can offer companies a ROI “Multiplier Effect” by lowering costs and increasing revenue potential.

About the author: Polina Braunstein is the CEO for Quake Global, the only manufacturer of network agnostic communicators for multiple satellite and terrestrial networks, providing manufacturers with a unified communications protocol across multiple global satellite and terrestrial networks that allows them to track, monitor and control their assets anywhere in the world from a single device. She can be reached at pbraunstein@quakeglobal.com.

Authors

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Optimizing utility power operations: How satellite tracking systems can detect inefficiencies

By Polina Braunstein, CEO, Quake Global

Many companies spend countless hours trying to ensure that they conduct their operations according to maximum profit potential. Maximizing productivity while minimizing costs are obvious key factors to the final equation.

However, an all too common obstacle to this goal is the inherent difficulty in monitoring certain aspects of those business operations, particularly in remote or mobile locations. The utility industry is no exception.

Here’s a good scenario. A power outage brings with it lost revenue and bad publicity, but perhaps the most costly aspect of such an event is the amount of overtime required making repairs to remote transmission lines.

This can be compounded exponentially if the equipment that is used to fix them is not operating effectively. Satellite technology can monitor in-use and idle times of such gear while it’s in the field that will identify issues related to how better to deploy the necessary people and gear to reduce down-time.

This case study is a clear illustration for why utility operators should consider leveraging the benefits of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) satellite technology.

With single or dual mode satellite/terrestrial modems as a standard feature for all their equipment, power generation companies can track, monitor and even control their offerings and assets anywhere in the world, all without the need for in-field inspectors or the sole word of the operators.

Newly released next-generation hardware now even permits customers to install network agnostic modems which seamlessly select the most economically appropriate network based on user defined criteria while maintaining industrial strength and fitting in the palm of your hand.

This exciting new technology also provides system integrators with a unified communications protocol to vastly simplify development by providing them with a single communication protocol for all networks.

How it works

Recent enhancements in modem functionality, form factor and cost reduction as well as in Low Earth Orbit and Geosynchronous Earth Orbit networks have made installing these devices on remote equipment not only viable, but highly cost effective.

Such technology allows the development of satellite communicators that transmit short bursts of data that use far less power and take up far less space than did their predecessors. 

These significant changes in global communication access have led many important industries to quickly introduce this technology into their business models not only to maintain their competitive advantages and avoid being technologically outmaneuvered by their competitors, but also to focus on their own business processes and efficiencies.

In addition to ensuring maximum productivity of specific repair equipment, companies can keep tabs on other important aspects of their operations. For instance, transmission lines can be tracked in real time and identify delays and breaks as they happen. This access to information as it occurs is critical for supervisors who must make adjustments with minimal operational impact.

Must haves

In order to ensure such systems will be of optimal value, satellite modem providers at a minimum must be able to offer companies the following features, functions and services:

* Cost-effectively operate in multiple environments. The modem is only as good as its transmit data, and that means seamlessly working with all the main network protocols, such as major satellite operators, GSM, and GPS.

* Support for subscriber-based services. The modem provider must also offer turnkey services — either directly or in partnership with systems integrators — that provide companies the ability to offer tracking and monitoring services to their customers without building out the infrastructure themselves.

* Proven success. The modem provider must be able to offer recent examples of how their systems have been used to reduce costs and increase revenues for a myriad of companies and operations, including transportation, heavy equipment, ships, fishing boats, pipelines and utility meters.

Utility companies are continually under pressure to find efficiencies wherever possible to keep profit margins stable in an era where customers continually put pressure on pricing.

Satellite modem technology — when effectively employed such as with QUAKE’s new line of Q4000 series modems — will be one of the key standard components in helping an organization achieve the highest operational efficiency, and in return can offer companies a ROI “Multiplier Effect” by lowering costs and increasing revenue potential.

About the author: Polina Braunstein is the CEO for Quake Global, the only manufacturer of network agnostic communicators for multiple satellite and terrestrial networks, providing manufacturers with a unified communications protocol across multiple global satellite and terrestrial networks that allows them to track, monitor and control their assets anywhere in the world from a single device. She can be reached at pbraunstein@quakeglobal.com.

Authors