Power Monitoring Aids LaGuardia

Power Monitoring Aids LaGuardia

LaGuardia Airport is part of the Port Authority of New York`s and New Jersey`s unique three-airport complex which includes John F. Kennedy and Newark International airports. By itself, LaGuardia is the 19th busiest domestic airport in the United States with 900 daily arrivals and departures of aircraft, carrying about 21 million passengers a year. LaGuardia buys electricity from the New York Power Authority, through Consolidated Edison`s delivery network and charges tenant businesses for power they consume. With a summer peak load of 15 million V A, LaGuardia can be likened to a small city consisting of four terminals, each having individual tenant businesses. In addition to airlines, these vendors include bars, restaurants and stores of all types. This airport mini-city also powers seven hangars, the marine air terminal historical landmark, police and public parking garages, and all street and aeronautical lighting.

LaGuardia`s ongoing $800 million makeover also meant upgrading its electrical distribution system to better service the airport`s many tenant activities. This started with the first expansion in 1992 of the central terminal when four building-utilization substations were upgraded and transformers boosted from 1,000 to 2,000 kVA capacity. In addition, a new west end substation was built with four additional 27 kV feeders coming into the airport. Expansion also required a better understanding of the airport`s present and future power needs. To that end, the Port Authority selected a PC-based remote power monitoring system for all new substation equipment from Power Measurement Ltd. The east side of the field, roughly half of the airport`s 25 electrical substations, is now connected to the new system. The field`s west side is scheduled for upgrade later this year with 27 more meters on order.

Expanding or upgrading the monitoring system is simply a matter of adding commercially available software, hardware and network components. As electrical distribution expands, so can the monitoring system. This modular, nonproprietary approach not only simplifies upgrading, but also provides a cost-effective way to incorporate the latest computer and communications technology. Presently, 46 PML panel-mounted “smart” digital instrumentation packages–both hard wire and modem connected to a remote PC master display station in the electrical unit–continuously scan the airport`s electrical distribution. The monitoring system`s instrumentation, a mix of digital 3,710 ACM and 3,720 ACM power meters and 3,800 RTU smart transducer interfaces, with preset alarms on a wide range of parameters, is always polled by the software on the master display station`s PC. All airport electrical distribution status is recorded on the PC`s hard drive. The monitoring system also helped the Port Authority identify how much power it was losing to maintain the current-limiting reactors that, similar to a tie bus, link LaGuardia`s substations.

Author

  • The Clarion Energy Content Team is made up of editors from various publications, including POWERGRID International, Power Engineering, Renewable Energy World, Hydro Review, Smart Energy International, and Power Engineering International. Contact the content lead for this publication at Jennifer.Runyon@ClarionEvents.com.

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The Clarion Energy Content Team is made up of editors from various publications, including POWERGRID International, Power Engineering, Renewable Energy World, Hydro Review, Smart Energy International, and Power Engineering International. Contact the content lead for this publication at Jennifer.Runyon@ClarionEvents.com.

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