New rates take effect for Duke Energy Carolinas customers in South Carolina

New rates became effective on June 1 for Duke Energy Carolinas customers in South Carolina based on the Public Service Commission of South Carolina order issued May 21. 

According to Duke Energy, the new rates remain below the national average, even after adjustments are made to reflect investments in cleaner, more reliable energy.

Duke Energy Carolinas serves about 591,000 customers in the Upstate region of South Carolina, including Greenwood, Greenville, Spartanburg, Lancaster and York counties.

Duke Energy Progress in South Carolina, separate from Duke Energy Carolinas in South Carolina, also changed rates for its customers beginning June 1. Duke Energy Progress serves about 169,000 customers in the northeastern part of South Carolina, including Darlington, Florence and Sumter counties.

The changes in customer rates come after a lengthy and very public process evaluating a request that is at the heart of the company’s ability to build a smarter energy infrastructure for South Carolina. 

The new rates also reflect the company’s efforts to deliver electricity that is cleaner than ever and ensure the best customer service possible. The new rates will also reflect savings from recent tax reform.

The PSCSC approved an average rate increase of 3.7 percent for all residential customers. Commercial and industrial customers will see an average increase of around 1.6 percent (actual rates vary by customer group and size).

Beginning June 1, a typical residential customer who uses 1,000 kWh of electricity monthly will pay about $122.45 per month, an increase of about $4.71. 

A rate change was also made June 1 for Duke Energy Progress customers. Duke Energy Progress serves about 169,000 customers in the northeastern part of South Carolina, including Darlington, Florence and Sumter counties.

Duke Energy Carolinas, a unit of Duke Energy, owns nuclear, coal, natural gas, renewables and hydroelectric generation. That diverse fuel mix provides about 20,200 MW of owned electric capacity to about 2.6 million customers in a 24,000-square-mile service area of North Carolina and South Carolina.

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The Clarion Energy Content Team is made up of editors from various publications, including POWERGRID International, Power Engineering, Renewable Energy World, Hydro Review, Smart Energy International, and Power Engineering International. Contact the content lead for this publication at Jennifer.Runyon@ClarionEvents.com.

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