Wallingford Energy files for 100 MW addition to Connecticut power plant

Wallingford Energy II filed a development and management plan, dated Sept. 2, with the Connecticut Siting Council for the installation and operation of two additional generating units of about 50 MW each at the existing power plant owned and operated by an affiliate, Wallingford Energy.

This plan, with detailed construction drawings and blueprints, was developed in accordance with the council’s conditions of approval for the project. That approval was issued in November 2015.

This extra capacity is being developed primarily to help satisfy capacity and fast-start operating reserve needs in Connecticut and New England. The two additional turbines, referred to as Units 6 and 7, will provide quick-start capacity in the Southwest Connecticut zone, a transmission-congested load pocket within the New England electrical system.

The project schedule at this point calls for an earthwork construction start in March 2017, a mechanical construction start in June 2017 and a commercial operation start for the completed project on April 1, 2018.

The project, consisting generally of two simple cycle aeroderivative combustion turbine generators (CTGs), two SCR/CO emissions control systems, one new BOP switchgear enclosure, one generator step-up transformer, and site work, will reside on a parcel of land leased by Wallingford Energy in Wallingford, Conn., which presently supports five simple cycle General Electric LM6000PC SPRINT gas turbines and appurtenant equipment.

Wallingford Energy leases from the town of Wallingford about 8.5 acres that is currently used for its facility. Pursuant to agreements with the Town of Wallingford, Wallingford Energy II intends to be a sublessee of its project site.

The physical footprint of the existing facility covers about 4.3 acres of the 8.5-acre site. This new project will use about 0.9 additional acres of land area on the overall property for the project’s two proposed generating units.

Additionally, portions of the broader site will be used for minor relocations of existing equipment and the addition of new project equipment, such as a generator step-up transformer.

The project site is zoned industrial. Land to the north, south and west of the site lies within the industrial district and is mostly developed for industrial uses such as manufacturing, the town of Wallingford wastewater treatment plant and the town’s capped landfill. Properties to the east of the site, across East Street, are zoned residential.

Landscaping, berms and screening walls on the project site and its parent tract help screen views from these non-industrial properties.

Author

  • Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy's Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication's editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor's degree from Central Michigan University.

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Barry Cassell is Chief Analyst for GenerationHub covering coal and emission controls issues, projects and policy. He has covered the coal and power generation industry for more than 24 years, beginning in November 2011 at GenerationHub and prior to that as editor of SNL Energy's Coal Report. He was formerly with Coal Outlook for 15 years as the publication's editor and contributing writer, and prior to that he was editor of Coal & Synfuels Technology and associate editor of The Energy Report. He has a bachelor's degree from Central Michigan University.

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